COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
AXIA COLLEGE
Courses are listed alpha numerically based on the academic discipline prefix.
Each course description is followed by the number of credits the course carries and the general education area it may satisfy.
Courses noted with the ~ symbol require prerequisites that vary by program. Please contact your Academic representative/Advisor for further information on scheduling.
ACC 220 ~ 3 credits
Survey of Accounting: The Maze of Numbers
Every business depends on its accountants to organize and maintain financial information. Accountants translate the maze of numbers most people see into valuable information that keeps a company going. This course introduces students to the accounting profession. It covers the role accounting plays in business and career options in accounting. Students learn the fundamentals of accounting principles and the accounting cycle.
ACC 225 ~ 3 credits
Financial Accounting
Financial accounting communicates economic information and serves as a tool for business decision making. Through financial accounting, accountants track how money circulates in an organization. This course provides an understanding of the fundamental principles of double entry accounting as applied to practical business situations. Emphasis is given to the following: debit and credit rules of accounting, T-accounts, journalizing transactions, adjusting entries for revenue and expense items, inventories, internal control with emphasis on cash, and accounting information systems. Students will be able to prepare and use the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows.
ACC 226 ~ 3 credits
Managerial Accounting
This course provides an introduction to managerial accounting and covers various fundamental concepts relating to the accounting environment. Topics include: short-term and long-term financial assets, current and long-term liabilities, contributed capital, stock holder equity, the analysis of financial statements, and cost concepts and allocation.
ACC 227 ~ 3 credits
Cost Accounting
ACC 227 introduces students to the concepts and decision-making issues of cost accounting. Emphasis is placed on management, analysis, business strategy, and implementation. Topics include cost terms and purposes, budgeting, job costing, pricing, and cost management.
ACC 230 ~ 3 credits
Financial Reporting: Peeking Under the Financial Hood
In this course, students will study how to analyze financial statements and methods used to value companies. Financial reports help managers choose between business paths. They also help investors and analysts evaluate the financial health of companies. This course is a practical means of discovering how financial data are generated and their limitations; techniques for analyzing the flow of business funds; and methods for selecting and interpreting financial ratios. It also presents analytical tools for predicting and testing assumptions about a firm’s performance.
ACC 240 3 credits
Income Tax: I Owe How Much?!
Every individual and every business must pay income tax. This course familiarizes students with what is - to many - a daunting process. It provides an introduction to basic income tax laws, unraveling what seems like the income tax puzzle. This course provides an introduction to basic income tax laws applicable to individuals and sole proprietorships. Topics include personal exemptions, gross income, adjustments, business expenses, non-business deductions, capital gains, losses, itemized filing requirements, includable income, adjustments, itemized deductions, and tax credits. Students will have the opportunity to work with personal income tax forms and software programs.
ACC 250 ~ 3 credits
Accounting Information Systems
Accountants today have put aside paper and pencil and taken advantage of advances in technology. Specialized software has made accounting transactions and reporting more dynamic and efficient. In this course, students will understand the role of accounting information systems in organizations. The course covers the different types of accounting systems used for the collection, organization, and presentation of information. Using accounting software, the students will explore how accounting information systems are used to assist management in decision-making processes. Emphasis will also be placed on the internal controls that should be included in an accounting information system.
ACC 260 ~ 3 credits
Accounting Ethics: Keeping it Clean
Businesses’ accounting practices are under heightened scrutiny following corporate scandals in recent years. Accountants have a legal and ethical responsibility to follow the law and standard accounting practices as they document their companies’ finances. The course is an introductory level course in ethics, focusing on the types of situations that pose ethical problems in business. An attempt will be made to help the student develop an ethical framework which will allow the student to address ethical issues in the business world. Current trends in accounting ethics, including the Sarbanes Oxley regulations and the ethical requirements for certified public accountants are emphasized.
ADJ 215 ~ 3 credits
Criminology
ADJ 215 highlights the causes of criminal behavior and the theoretical interpretations of such behavior. Students are introduced to criminological methods of inquiry, and review several different classifications of crime. Students also consider the public policy implications of various approaches to criminology.
ADJ 225 ~ 3 credits
Juvenile Justice Procedures
ADJ 225 explores how society responds to juvenile crime—the programs and processes that exist in the juvenile justice system; the roles of the police, courts, and corrections; and prevention efforts in schools and community-based systems. Additionally, students develop an understanding of the historical roots of juvenile justice and its evolution to present-day practice.
ADJ 235 ~ 3 credits
Ethics and the Administration of Justice
ADJ 235 presents the ethical standards, roles, and responsibilities of criminal justice professionals and examines potential profession-specific ethical dilemmas. Ethical theories are applied to real and hypothetical scenarios in the justice system.
ADJ 255 ~ 3 credits
Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice
Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice addresses relevant matters that shape the current United States criminal justice system, including the media and media applications, police power, the death penalty, fairness of courts, corrections, the War on Drugs, terrorism, law enforcement, and national security. Through study and debate of these issues, students acquire a comprehension of the modern criminal justice system, and are encouraged to develop their own opinions about these matters.
ADJ 265 ~ 3 credits
Interpersonal Communication in Criminal Justice
This course prepares students to communicate effectively in both written and verbal form. It covers best practices in investigative reporting, written reports and memos, court reporting, and testimony. Additionally, it covers interpersonal verbal communication with victims, suspects, and civilians. Other topics include interviews, interrogations, and uses of technology related to the field. The goal of this course is to encourage students to develop their verbal and written communication skills relating to criminal justice professions.
ADJ 275 ~ 3 credits
Criminal Procedures
This course focuses on the law and practice of procedural concepts within the criminal justice process. Through interactive case studies, relevant discussions, and comprehensive assessments, students will learn to apply legal concepts to real-life situations. Students will not only recognize significant court decisions that shaped these legal concepts and their application in everyday life, but will also engage in debate designed to further the student's understanding of how these concepts play an integral role in the pursuit of a fair and balanced justice system. In particular, students will use these various procedural concepts to determine the comprehensive outcome of a specific fact-pattern scenario.
AED 200 ~ 3 credits
Contemporary Issues in American Education
This course provides an overview of the teaching profession. It introduces the student to the various issues affecting teachers. Its primary focus will be on contemporary issues teachers and educators face in today’s schools. Throughout the course, all aspects of the teaching profession will be incorporated from the diversity of students in the classroom, to school organization and governance, to teaching philosophies and instruction. This course provides a foundation for understanding the education profession.
AED 201~ 3 credits
Teaching as a Profession
AED 201 introduces the common issues education professionals face in their field. In addition to discussing the professional foundations of teaching, students examine and discuss issues related to the needs, rights, and responsibilities of diverse learners in a changing society. This course also addresses governance and legal issues in the education system.
AED 202 ~ 3 credits
Child Development
AED 202 provides a context for understanding and addressing teaching and learning issues encountered in the classroom. Students are introduced to the major benchmarks of children’s social, emotional, cognitive, and language development, as well as the notion of multiple intelligences. As each of these topics is addressed, the instructional implications are also discussed.
AED 203 ~ 3 credits
Classroom Instruction
AED 203 encompasses the various aspects of classroom instruction for elementary and middle school. The course builds on the foundation of curriculum instruction by examining instructional approaches, programs, lesson plans, and assessments in language arts, social science, mathematics, and science. In addition, it addresses ways in which instruction can be organized and managed effectively to facilitate learning.
AED 204 ~ 3 credits
Diversity in the Classroom
AED 204 focuses on developing understanding of cultural diversity concepts in education, as well as on developing understanding of implications for learning and instruction. Students read about and discuss issues related to educational equity and multiculturalism. Students connect these perspectives to instructional strategies that may be used in the classroom.
AED 205 ~ 3 credits
Classroom Management
Effective education professionals are able to gain student cooperation and foster motivation, so all students can be actively engaged in the learning process. This course presents research-based, practical strategies that provide support toward a positive and effective learning environment. Topics covered include establishing classroom standards, monitoring student learning and behavior, and techniques to respond appropriately to various student needs and disruptive behavior.
AED 222 ~ 3 credits
Intro to the Exceptional Learner
This course provides an overview of the exceptional learner, the student who differs from the average or normal student, with emphasis on factors relating to current practices, identification, characteristics, and educational adaptations. The course focuses on issues related to mildly disabled, severely disabled, emotionally and behaviorally disordered, mentally retarded, and gifted students.
ART 101 ~ 3 credits
Introduction to Art
This course introduces students to the elements and principles of art as well as the creation of various media, such as painting, sculpture, architecture, design, photography, and the decorative arts. Students apply techniques for viewing art critically to build an appreciation of various art forms. Themes within the course include contemporary topics in the arts, cultural diversity in the arts, and the arts in a historical context.
BEH 210 3 credits
Personality Theories
In BEH 210, students study and evaluate personality theories. Topical areas include psychoanalytic, neo-Freudian, behavioral, cognitive, trait, and humanistic personality theories. Student activities include, but are not limited to, collaborative discussions, theory evaluations, a persuasive paper, and development of a personality theory.
BEH 221 3 credits
Introduction to Behavioral Science
This course focuses on human personality, motivation, learning, and cognition. The theories and insights of major figures in psychology are discussed. Neuroscience, psychological disorders, and therapies are also considered in relation to human behavior.
BEH 225 3 credits
Introduction to Behavioral Science
This course focuses on human personality, motivation, learning, and cognition. The theories and insights of major figures in psychology are discussed. Neuroscience, psychological disorders, and therapies are also considered in relation to human behavior.
BIO 100 ~ 4 credits
Introduction to Life Science + Lab
This course applies a broad, conceptual understanding of biology. Students are introduced to scientific ideologies and concepts that not only shape the biological world, but also shape humans. Students examine the scientific method, evolution and biodiversity, the biology of cells, physiology, the dynamics of inheritance, and the effect humans have on the environment. The text emphasizes methods and the theoretical foundations of ideas, while minimizing isolated facts. It stresses the integration of ideas, making connections that form an understanding of the living world. The weekly online labs add a practical component to the class. The labs build upon the concepts in the text and offer a chance to interact with the material and further their understanding.
BUS 210 ~ 3 credits
Foundations of Business
In this course students will explore the foundation of business by reviewing topics regarding the structure and culture of the modern business environment. Additional topics include the evolution of business, the role of the business ethics, communication, technology, operations, leadership, and human resources. Upon completion, students are better prepared to make informed decisions regarding their educational and professional goals.
CIS 105 ~ 3 credits
Survey of Computer Information Systems
tThis course presents an overview of the various technologies imbedded in every aspect of society. Students gain a basic understanding of how a computer functions as a single unit, in a network, and as a connection to the Internet. Other topics include security issues and the use of productivity software, such as word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation applications. The course also addresses social and ethical issues related to using computers.
CJS 200 ~ 3 credits
Foundations of the Criminal Justice System
This course is an introduction to the foundational elements of the criminal justice system. Students examine this system from its influential past to its multi-faceted present to its theorized future. This course gives the student an interactive pathway through the laws that protect the system, through the people that enforce the system, and through the courts that govern this system. It also provides an overview of the correctional systems and their impact and roles in American society. Other topics include crime causation, terrorism, and cyber crime related issues.
CJS 210 ~ 3 credits
Fundamentals of Policing
This course provides students with the opportunity to gain a basic understanding of policing in the United States. It examines the history of the police, the emerging role of private security, and the organizational concepts of police departments. This course also discusses the relationships between the police department and their respective communities. Other topics include recruitment processes, diversity, culture, and laws that govern policing. Students will have the opportunity to research their local police department for a closer look at policing in their community.
CJS 220 ~ 3 credits
Introduction to Criminal Court System
This course is an introduction to the fundamental elements of the courts in our criminal justice system. Students will examine the many complexities affecting the court system, from the theory behind the creation of laws to the implementation of such laws. This course provides an in-depth look into the roles and functions of the professionals interacting within the court while outlining the courtroom process. Other topics include punishments, appeals, and plea bargains.
CJS 230 ~ 3 credits
Introduction to Corrections - A World Apart
This course introduces students to the fundamental elements of the corrections system within the criminal justice field. Students will examine the early implementations of punishment as well as evolving philosophies of sentencing. Students will gain insight into the purpose and functions of jails and prisons, while establishing a connection between prison life and prisoner's rights. Students will also take an in-depth look into how parole and probation affect our communities. Other topics include correctional management, rehabilitation, and correctional systems in other countries.
CJS 240 ~ 3 credits
Introduction to Juvenile Justice
This course is a general orientation to the concept of delinquency and the field of juvenile justice. Students will examine the nature of delinquency, as well as a variety of theories and suspected causes of delinquent behavior. Students will study factors related to delinquency and/or prevention including gender, youthful behavior, family, peers, drug use, school, and community. This course will also familiarize students with the evolution of juvenile justice and key players in the juvenile justice process. Additionally, students will develop an understanding of the juvenile court process, as well as juvenile detention, restitution, prevention and treatment.
CJS 250 ~ 3 credits
Introduction to Security
This course is an introduction to contemporary security practices and programs. Students will study the origins of private security, its impact on our criminal justice system, and the roles of security personnel. Students will also examine the growth and privatization of the security industry, and study the elements of physical security including surveillance and alarm systems. The course will cover legal and liability issues, which determine the extent of private security authority as well as its limitations. This course will also focus on the current and future integration of private security services in law enforcement agencies.
CMC 210 ~ 3 credits
Mass Media Overview and History: Sight, Sound & Mind
This course provides students with a foundation for the major venues of telecommunications, timeliness of their development, and the ways in which they converge. It introduces the influences and responsibilities of mass media with regard to culture, privacy, and ethics. Global effects are addressed, as well as the role of news media in a democratic society. The course includes a job guide to introduce students to media opportunities and outline preparation strategies for a career in communications.
CMC 220 ~ 3 credits
Information Products and Presentations
News is presented differently for print, web, and broadcast delivery. This course covers the practical functions of reporting, writing, editing, and designing for each of these domains. It examines conventions within the culture of journalism and critiques various media from the viewpoint of both the producer and the consumer. Students continue to investigate the effect of news on individuals and society, and to explore career opportunities. This course requires a microphone and speakers or headphones for recording and listening to digital audio files. Students download free QualComm Pure Voice® software for recording audio files.
CMC 230 ~ 3 credits
Communication Processes: You’re a Fine One to Talk
Successful business communication entails what is appropriate and effective for all parties involved so that each can benefit from the outcome. This course prepares students to optimize their relationships within situations of information exchange by analyzing different aspects of message delivery, accommodating cultural as well as situational contexts, and managing control and conflict. It addresses interpersonal communication, small groups, organizational cooperation, public speaking, and mass communication channels, with frequent self-assessment activities.
CMC 240 ~ 3 credits
Information Strategies: Putting 2 and 2 Together
This course addresses effective communication strategies via the gathering, analysis, evaluation , and synthesis that comprise information literacy as a standard of modern problem solving. Students recognize the need for information, formulate meaningful questions to guide their search, access what is cogent, interpret bias, and integrate material for a compelling presentation. Furthermore, they perform these tasks with a regard for social responsibility and professional ethics.
CMC 250 ~ 3 credits
Information Sources: Where It’s At
Finding information can be a journalistic challenge, whether it's an investigative project or a routine report. This course reviews the process of conducting investigative research: generating ideas for a research project; locating primary, secondary, and people sources; using research techniques and computer-assisted tools; managing and evaluating information; and applying writing techniques to report the results of an information search. Special emphasis is given to exploring the resources available for investigating a variety of governmental, social, health, business, and environmental issues.
CMC 260 ~ 3 credits
Communication Variety: The Spice of Life
The field of communications underlies virtually every aspect of today’s increasing global interdependence. This course addresses how customs, values, and societal systems generate expectations—often tacit—about how communication should occur, and problems—often misunderstood—about how communication is occurring. Students develop greater sensitivity to intercultural and intracultural differences to foster effective information exchange and develop mutually satisfying communication solutions. 3 credits
COM 130 3 credits
Business Research and Writing for the IT Professional
This course focuses on research and writing skills essential for success in information technology (IT) professions. IT research types and resources are covered, as well as how research is used in IT professions. Skills include producing Microsoft® Visio diagrams; using visual elements; writing instruction and process; and writing surveys, reports, and proposals. Students are introduced to technical writing, including but not limited to general document types, layout, strategies, and techniques.
COM 140 3 credits
Contemporary Business Communication
In this course, students develop an understanding of the formats and style of the written word as they create a variety of effective business communications for both internal and external audiences. Selected readings provide the foundation for discussions of the purpose, audience, structure, tone, and content of business writing. Grammar exercises focus on sentence structure, punctuation, capitalization, and bias-free language.
COM 150 3 credits
Effective Essay Writing
In this course, students develop academic writing skills. Students use the writing process to construct an expository essay with an emphasis on coherence and correctness in written communication. Students also conduct basic research for the expository essay. Selected readings provide the basis for discussion regarding the difference between fact and opinion. Grammar exercises focus on verb tense and form, subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement, and pronoun case. Students also complete exercises covering topic sentences, paragraph development, citations, and formatting guidelines.
COM 220 3 credits
Research Writing
Students focus on gathering research, evaluating and documenting sources, and developing a major research paper. Selected readings prompt discussion regarding bias, rhetorical devices, arguments, and counterarguments. Grammar exercises address commonly confused words, modifiers, parallel structure, and sentence variety.
CRT 205 3 credits
Critical Thinking
In this course, students develop the ability to think clearly and critically. Practice includes developing writing skills that enable students to clearly present claims to support their conclusions and avoid reinforcing biases. Students are given the opportunity to analyze and discuss various types of media-including television, Internet, and print-to determine which sources provide the most reliable information. Topics addressed include the relationship between critical thinking and clear writing, credibility of sources, rhetorical devices, fallacies, unclear or misleading language, and the characteristics of various types of arguments.
~ECO 205 3 credits
Economic Theory
This course will introduce the fundamental theories of microeconomics and macroeconomics. The economic principles studied in this course will be applied to everyday life as students research an industry, debate issues with trade agreements, discuss the effects of a shift in labor supply and demand, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the Consumer Price Index calculation. In particular, learners will research an industry affected by the economy and will perform an economic analysis of this chosen industry.
ENG 101 3 credits
Effective Essay Writing
Students develop academic writing skills. The emphasis is on coherence and correctness in written communication as students use the writing process to craft an expository essay. Students also conduct basic research for the expository essay. Selected readings provide the basis for discussion regarding the difference between fact and opinion. Grammar exercises focus on verb tense, subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement, and pronoun case.
ENG 102 ~ 3 credits
Research Writing
Students focus on gathering research, evaluating and documenting sources, and developing a major research paper. Selected readings prompt discussion regarding bias, rhetorical devices, arguments, and counterarguments. Grammar exercises address commonly confused words, modifiers, parallel structure, and sentence variety.
ETH 125 3 credits
Cultural Diversity
This course is designed to educate students about issues of race and ethnicity by presenting historical and modern perspectives on diversity in the United States, and by providing tools necessary to promote a respectful and inclusive society. Students will complete several activities that allow them to examine their own values in relation to the values of various other racial and ethnic communities.
FIN 200~ 3 credits
Introduction to Finance: Harvesting the Money Tree
This course gives students an overview of finance concepts, terminology, and principles. It is an introduction to the role of finance in the business world. Topics covered include the relationship between finance and accounting, careers in finance, basic financial analysis and planning techniques, financial ratios, profit, cash flow, and sources of business financing.
FIN 215 3 credits
Financial Management
This course provides an introduction to financial management and covers various fundamental concepts relating to the financial environment. Topics include: the federal income tax structure, financial statements, risk and return of investments, time value analysis, stocks and bonds, capital budgeting, and alternative asset financing.
FIS 200 ~ 3 credits
History of Money: Matter, Medium, and Measure
This course investigates the nature and uses of money, from ancient times to the present, as well as considering its future utility and relevance. It covers the role of money in economic, social, and political contexts, covering views from personal to global perspectives.
FIS 210 ~ 3 credits
Personal Finance: What Does Opportunity Cost?
This course examines and applies financial decision-making techniques to everyday life. It covers the processes of how to make major personal financial decisions of a personal financial nature, such as preparing budgets, creating saving plans, using credit, buying insurance, paying taxes, and making investments. This course also provides the student opportunities to examine careers within the financial services industry.
FIS 240 ~ 3 credits
Investment Management: Greater Returns Mean Greater ...??
This course deals with the nature of financial investments from the viewpoint of the individual investor. It covers cash-flow management, retirement planning, estate planning, insurance issues, and investment opportunities. Career avenues in the financial investment arena are also examined in this course.
FIS 250 ~ 3 credits
Risk Management: Insuring Uncertainty
This course explores the nature of risk, techniques used to mitigate loss, and the value of insurance in financial planning at personal and organizational levels. It covers insurance principles and products such as health, life, property, liability, and casualty. Within this course, students will also have the occasion to examine career opportunities in the insurance industry.
FIS 260 ~ 3 credits
Financial Markets and Institutions: You Can Bank On It
This course examines the operations of financial institutions in the process of financial intermediation. It covers the roles, responsibilities, and regulatory requirements of various types of financial institutions as they connect individuals and organizations to capital markets.
GEN 105 3 credits
Skills for Learning in an Information Age
This course introduces students to learning in an information-rich society. Students will develop strategies for successful distance learning, time management, and for managing the abundance of information available in today's society. Students will also explore the appropriate use of information in an academic environment. Specific topics for the course include computing skills for distance learning, online library use, academic honesty, and the development of effective study skills.
GLG 101 ~ 4 credits
Introduction to Geology + Lab
This course gives an overview of physical geology by introducing concepts such as plate tectonics and geologic time. Students gain familiarity with the processes that shape the earth’s surface and recognize the relevance of studying geology. Topics include the rock cycle, weathering, formation of geological features, and preservation of geological resources. This course includes a lab.
HCA 210 ~ 3 credits
Introduction to Health Care: Riding the Fourth Wave
This course provides a broad overview of the various functions of the United States health care system. The historical evolution of health care is examined and the cost and financing of health care is explored. The student is introduced to the various forms of provider models and service delivery systems found in private and public health sectors, including ambulatory care, acute, mental, and long-term care. The student will also have opportunities to identify, research, and discuss career opportunities in health care.
HCA 220 ~ 3 credits
The Language of Health Care
This course introduces the student to the language of health care—the terminology and vocabulary, as well as their application. The course also offers the student engagement and interaction into the dynamics of both language and health care. Through comprehensive discussions and activities, the student will have the opportunity to be immersed in the words and world of medicine. This course requires a microphone and speakers or headphones for recording and listening to digital audio files. Students download free QualComm Pure Voice® software for recording audio files.
HCA 230 ~ 3 credits
Communication Skills for the Health Care Professional
This course offers the student the foundational knowledge and skills to communicate effectively in a variety of health care workplace settings. The student will discuss social and cultural influences on communication efforts, examine channels of communication including internal, external, and technology related communication, and the impact of consumer and interdisciplinary communication.
HCA 240 ~ 3 credits
Health and Diseases: Understanding the Pathos of Pathology
This course introduces the student to the basic principles of illness and disease as well as the impact of disease trends on the delivery of services. The clinical manifestations of diseases commonly seen in the health care environment are reviewed. Topics include promoting health, infectious and noninfectious disease, AIDS, environmental health, and cancer. In addition, students will be introduced to the common medical procedures, , and terminology used to diagnose and treat diseases.
HCA 250 ~ 3 credits
The Psychology of Health: My Head Hurts All Over My Body
Just as the mind and body are interconnected so are health and psychology. In this course, the student is introduced to the psychological factors that relate to the prevention and treatment of illness. Heightened health consciousness as well as medical approaches to health problems are both addressed. The course also exposes the student to elements of cultural diversity as they impact health care awareness, assessment, and treatment.
HCA 260 3 credits
Health Care’s Law and Ethics Environment
This course is designed as an introduction to the laws and ethics of providing health care services. The course is also intended to familiarize the student with state and federal health regulation. Since ethics and laws are both dynamic, emphasis is placed on discussing some of the dramatic changes in health care delivery, such as managed care, patient self-determination, medical record keeping, and various laws that impact health care employment.
HCA 270 ~ 3 credits
Financial Matters for Health Care Professionals
This course is designed as an introduction to terminology, processes, functions, and reports commonly encountered in financial operations of health care program or agency settings. This course introduces the concepts of basic managerial financial functions, such as budgeting, accounting, cost analysis, reimbursement methods, and the responsibilities of financial management. Documents that health care managers are likely to encounter and various methods of payment for services are also introduced in this course.
HCA 280 3 credits
Technology Information for Health Care Administrators
This course surveys the use of technology in health care and its delivery. It not only covers hardware, software, and telecommunications in health care, but topics such as security, medical informatics, computerized medical devises, and assistive technology. The course introduces students to information technology in various health care fields including radiology, dentistry, surgery, and pharmacy.
HCP 210 ~ 3 credits
Intro to Pharmacy Practice: The Alchemy of Health Care
This course provides students the opportunity to explore fundamental career skills and knowledge associated with pharmacy procedures. Courses include pharmacy ethics, terminology, route and dosage formulations, and operations in community and institutional settings. A review of the 200 most commonly distributed medications includes origins, therapeutic usage, generic names, and naming systems. Students examine basic procedures and equipment requirements for compounding and sterile preparation.
HCP 220 ~ 3 credits
Pharmacy Calculations: Just For Good Measure
Fundamental math skills required in pharmaceutical calculations are covered in this course. Topics review basic math skills—number systems, fractions, decimals, ratios, proportion, and percents—and conversion of measurement systems—metric, apothecary, avoirdupois and household. Students interpret prescriptions, analyze drug labeling, calculate drug dosages, and distinguish procedures and equipment for oral, injectable, and intravenous medications.
HCR 210 ~ 3 credits
Patient Records: Keeping it Real
Documenting patients’ health information is central to the continuity of medical care and the collection of medical data. This course examines the content, development, format, routing, filing, and storage of patient records. Settings include hospitals, physicians’ offices and alternate care facilities. Students review uses of health data and legal aspects of health information management.
HCR 220 ~ 3 credits
Claims Preparation I: Clean Bills of Health
Medical records processing revolves around insurance and reimbursement. This course focuses on the background, knowledge and skills related to basic billing duties, HIPAA regulations, patient encounters, and the preparation, compliance, and transmission of claims. Students are introduced to the history, current state and future direction of the major diagnostic and procedural coding systems.
HCR 230 ~ 3 credits
Claims Preparation II: Footing the Bills
This course continues medical records processing instruction. Topics focus on the background, knowledge and skills related to private payers, Medicare, Medicaid, Tricare, Champva, workers compensation and disability. Claims processing includes payments, appeals, and secondary claims; patient billing and collections; hospital billing and reimbursement.
HCR 240 ~ 3 credits
Computerizing Medical Data: The Paper Chase Goes Techno
This medical records capstone course enables students to develop career skills in computerizing data through application of a software program widely used in health care. While popular for medical billing and collections, MedisoftTM also applies to managing patients’ health care information, scheduling, correspondence, and a variety of reports. This course requires a PC with Windows 2000® or Windows XP® operating system.
HIS 115 ~ 3 credits
US History to 1865
This course surveys social, political, and economic events that shaped the United States from its first inhabitants to 1865. Students delves into historical events in North American history ranging from Spanish and English colonization to the fight for an individual, American independence, culture, and government, to the Civil War. This course equips students with a general understanding of important early historical events that have played a role in our current social, political, and economic environment.
HIS 125 ~ 3 credits
US History from 1865 to 1945
This course examines U.S. social, political, and economic events between 1865 and 1945. Students will learn to appreciate the significance of key historical events and figures, including the rise of big business, urbanization, World War I, the Great Depression, and World War II. This course equips students with a general understanding of how important historical events impact future development of the United States.
HIS 135 ~ 3 credits
The American Experience Since 1945
This course is an overview of the principal social, political, economic, and global events which have shaped the American experience since World War II. Understanding modern American history is a necessity in today's ever-changing world. This course aims to supply the tools for understanding current political, social, cultural, and economic problems in the U.S. by applying historical perspective to analyze contemporary issues.
HRM 240 3 credits
Human Resources Management
This course provides an overview of key employment practices necessary to effectively manage human resources within an organization. The major human resource functions of planning, recruiting, selecting, training, and appraising will be emphasized. Other topics will include company policies and procedures, federal and state regulation compliance, rights and responsibilities of employers and employees, and future trends.
HSM 210 ~ 3 credits
Human Services in the United States
This course is a foundation for studies of human services in the United States. It provides an overview of the evolution of American human services delivery systems, including historical perspectives, as well as current and future trends. It covers the role of human services workers, how needs are determined and met, and factors that affect the delivery of services such as theoretical perspectives, social policies, and government regulations. Community advocacy, prevention techniques, contemporary issues, and careers in the human services industry are also examined.
HSM 220 ~ 3 credits
Human Services Administration: So You Want to Help People
This course discusses the roles and responsibilities of administrators in human services organizations. It covers recent studies related to the changing contests of human services delivery, leadership, organizational culture, human resource management, financial management, strategic planning, working with boards, marketing and public relations, social entrepreneurship, partnership, and collaboration.
HSM 230 ~ 3 credits
Ethical Issues in Human Services Organizations
HSM 230 explores the legal and ethical environments of human service organizations. Students consider tools and traditions for ethical decisionmaking, the role of the leader, and the role of organizational culture in sustaining a moral vision, and the design of and need for legal and ethical oversight. Students analyze current ethical and legal dilemmas and controversies through case studies and debate.
HSM 240 ~ 3 credits
Public Policy Development in Human Services
This course focuses on the formation and execution of public policy and programs by government and private organizations within human services. Emphasis is placed on evaluative and analytical approaches for determining positive and negative characteristics of policies and programs. Students will learn to analyze and critique organizations and the policies and programs within those organizations.
HSM 260 ~ 3 credits
Financial Management for Human Service Managers
This course focuses on the conceptual understanding and practice of financial management as it applies to human service agencies. Students complete the course with a better understanding of basic accounting concepts, budgets and budgeting systems, and how to create performance measures, and the ability to analyze financial statements for the purpose of cost analysis and forecasting. Aspects of setting fees, funding and risk management are also covered.
HSM 270 ~ 3 credits
Program Planning and Grant Proposal Writing in Human Services
This course provides practical knowledge in program planning, grant proposal writing, and program evaluation. Students will examine the planning process from conceptualization to implementation and evaluation. Also discussed is how to locate private and public funding for human service programs and agencies.
HSM 280 3 credits
Technologies in Human Service Organizations
This course surveys the use of technology in human services. It covers how technology is affecting the delivery of human services and the use of technology in service delivery. Students will examine the ways in which information systems affect agency and administrative systems.
HTT 200 ~ 3 credits
Hospitality: Food, Shelter, and Fun Away From Home
This course is an overview of the history, current trends, and general organizational structure of the hospitality industry. Additionally, the course covers topics such as recreational entertainment, economic impact of hospitality, and service standards. The course also gives students the opportunity to examine careers in tourism, foodservice, and lodging industries.
HTT 210 ~ 3 credits
Travel & Tourism: For Work, For Pleasure, Forever Enriching
This course introduces the tourism industry and its major components such as the travel mart, surface travel, air travel, business travel, cruises, and recreation. It covers current issues in tourism and their effect on the hospitality industry as a whole including economic, political, and cultural forces, and quality of life impacts on host locals. Career opportunities within travel and tourism are also discussed.
HTT 220 ~ 3 credits
Information Technology in Hospitality, Travel and Tourism: When Distribution Joins Automation
This course explores the impact of information and communications technology on the structure and operations of the hospitality, travel, and tourism industry. It covers topics dealing with the interaction between consumers, intermediaries, operatives, and management through rapidly changing technologies. Effects on service quality, productivity, efficiency, and profitability will be examined.
HTT 230 ~ 3 credits
Finance for Hospitality Professionals: Bed & Balance Sheets
This course focuses on conceptual awareness and practice of financial management as it applies to hospitality, travel, and tourism industries. It covers the basics of accounting, budgets and budgeting systems, performance measures creation, and financial statement evaluation for the purpose of cost analysis and planning. Aspects of setting prices, funding, and risk management are also covered.
HTT 240 ~ 3 credits
Food & Beverage Management: Eat, Drink, & Be Healthy
This course integrates the basic concept and practical skills related to foodservice operations, from the front office to the kitchen. It covers basic principles of purchasing and cost management of food and beverage, as well as menu planning, institutional food service, and quality control.
HTT 250 ~ 3 credits
Lodging and Resort Operations: There’s Room In the Inn
This course studies the lodging industry, its history, growth, development, and future direction. It covers front office procedures and interpersonal dynamics from reservations through the night audit. The course also examines career opportunities in lodging and resorts.
HUM 130 ~ 3 credits
Religions of the World
This course studies the major religions of the world. Topics include Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Indigenous Cultures, Islam, Judaism, and Taoism. Students will objectively study the origins and major figures, and compare and contrast each of the major religions. During this course, each student will visit a religious site and interview a person of an unfamiliar faith.
HUM 201 3 credits
World Culture and the Arts
Culture and the arts play a complex role in enriching the human experience. This course will analyze the social role of the arts in the early civilizations through the present day. Learners will explore the key contributions in visual art, architecture, literature, and music of the civilizations presented in this course. In particular, learners will construct a virtual museum comprised of various artifacts representing several cultures.
HUM 205 ~ 3 credits
World Culture and the Arts
Culture and the arts play a complex role in enriching the human experience. This course will analyze the social role of the arts in the early civilizations through the present day. Learners will explore the key contributions in visual art, architecture, literature, and music of the civilizations presented in this course. In particular, learners will construct a virtual museum comprised of various artifacts representing several cultures.
INB 205 ~ 3 credits
International Business
This course introduces students to the impact of geography, the Internet, and different cultures on international business. Students will focus on the three environments in which international business is conducted and the uncontrollable forces at work in all business environments. Topics discussed will include the importance of international organizations, the international monetary system, and the relevance of certain aspects of international business to managers and business people.
INS 205 ~ 3 credits
Introcution to World Cultures and Social Environments
This course introduces students to communicating in a multicultural society. Students will study communication in different world cultures and develop strategies for overcoming communication barriers. Students will also compare cultural patterns between countries and explore various theories relating to culture and communication. Specific topics for the course include value orientation; cultural dimensions; assimilation; the status of women, children, and families; and the influence of media and marketing on cultural identity.
IT 101P 3 credits
Skills for Learning in an Information Age
This course introduces students to learning in an information-rich society. Students will develop strategies for successful distance learning, time management, and for managing the abundance of information available in today's society. Students will also explore the appropriate use of information in an academic environment. Specific topics for the course include computing skills for distance learning, online library use, academic honesty, and the development of effective study skills.
IT 205 ~ 3 credits
Management of Information Systems
This course introduces students to the world of information technology. Students will examine the technology concepts included in business systems, networking, and project management and explore the systems development life cycle. Specific topics for the course include: hardware components, software applications, operating systems, databases, programming, as well as the security, privacy, and safety issues associated with information technology.
IT 206 3 credits
PC Applications support
This course will prepare students to support Microsoft Office applications. The student will learn the product features of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook and Access. This course is based on the requirements of the Microsoft Office Specialist certification.
IT 209 3 credits
Information Systems Fundamentals
This course introduces the fundamentals of computer systems and the role of information processing in today's business environment. An overview is presented of information systems, systems development, operating systems and programming, database management, networking and telecommunications, and the Internet.
IT 210 ~ 3 credits
Fundamentals of Programming with Algorithms and Logic
This course provides students with a basic understanding of programming practices. Concepts covered include flowcharting, pseudocode methodologies, and an understanding of programming practices. Students will learn how these concepts, when properly applied, improve program design.
IT 213 3 credits
Algorithms and Logic for Computer Programming
This course provides students with a basic understanding of programming development practices. Concepts covered include the application of algorithms and logic to the design and development of computer programs to address the problem solving requirements associated with business information systems. This course will cover procedural programming concepts including data types, controls structures, functional decomposition, arrays, and files.
IT 214 3 credits
Office Software Support Fundamentals
This course is an introduction to the support fundamentals of desktop software including word processor, spreadsheet, presentation, database, and personal information management (email, calendar, contact management and web browsing) applications.
IT 215 ~ 3 credits
JAVA Programming
JAVA has rapidly become the language of choice for platform independent implementations. This course provides a general introduction to programming, data structures and object-oriented programming in particular. The syntax and semantics of the JAVA language are addressed, as well as related topics which include object-oriented programming concepts, terminology, and notation. This class requires the Java2 Software Development Kit, Student Edition V, 1.4.2_02 2003.
IT 218 3 credits
Introduction to C/C++
This course introduces the student to C/C++ programming. The syntax and semantics of the C/C++ programming language are used to produce simple computer programs.
IT 220 ~ 3 credits
Internet Concepts
IT 220 covers the development of the Internet, its business applications, and its distinction from the World Wide Web. Provided within this course are foundational topics that include the structure, topology, and connectivity of clients and servers on the World Wide Web via Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). An overview of Web page design, its practical use, and stylistic elements are also discussed.
IT 221 ~ 3 credits
Analysis and Design of Information Systems
This course explores areas of project analysis, design, and project management. The foundation of the course provides the background, rationale, and process of disciplined project planning and management using the Systems Development Lifecycle (SDLC) methodology. Students learn about conducting user interviews and about developing key project plans and reports. Business elements, such as the following, are covered: the role of project members, scope creation documentation, scheduling, staffing, budgeting, logistical and political considerations, and implementation. Employing concepts of the SDLC, project plans are developed by using Microsoft® Project, by writing project plan documents, and by writing project reports. Microsoft® Project is required for this course.
IT 221N ~ 3 credits
Analysis & Design of Information Systems
This course explores areas of project analysis, design and project management. Foundational coverage is provided covering the background, rationale and process of disciplined project planning and management using the Systems Development Lifecycle (SDLC) methodology. Students will be familiarized with conducting user interviews, developing key project plans and reports. Business elements such as role of project members, scope creation documentation, project scheduling, staffing, budgeting, logistical and political considerations to project planning and implementation are covered. Project plans will be developed employing concepts of the SDLC via written project plan documents and project reports, as well as project plans created using Microsoft Project. Microsoft Project is required for this course.
IT 230 ~ 3 credits
Computer Networking
The fundamentals of networking and telecommunications are introduced in this course. Topics include the rationale of networking and its benefits and utilization within a business environment. Data and voice communications are covered broadly, as are connectivity protocols, including Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). The Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Reference Model, networking standards, and rationale are also presented. Primary network topologies of local area networks (LANs) and their connectivity to larger enterprise wide area networks (WANs) are studied within a business context.
IT 233 3 credits
Windows Server Configurations
This course is a survey of Windows Server Configurations. Topics emphasize the structure and the various applications supported by Windows Server. The course includes remote, hands-on access to Windows lab exercises.
IT 235 ~ 3 credits
Image Editing and Implementation
Design elements such as basic composition, style, use of color, textures, graphic manipulation, photographic re-touching and text/font design are introduced. File formats, sizing and packaging for export are covered in this class. Concepts such as pre-press production and printing are introduced. Imaging program, Adobe Photoshop® Elements 3.0 is required for this class.
IT 236 ~ 3 credits
Intro to Web Design I
Intro to Web Design I combines the study of foundational Web design principles with the practice of Web page construction to create business and e-business Web sites. Students conceptualize, design, and refine a Web site while satisfying class assignment and final project requirements. Students explore best practices for creating quality Web page layouts, navigation, appearance, functionality, and multimedia. Used to create basic designs are Adobe® Photoshop® Elements, and the Macromedia® Studio MX 2004 software package which includes Macromedia® Dreamweaver® and Macromedia® Flash®.
IT 237 ~ 3 credits
Intro to Web Design II
This course focuses on the creation of robust, well-formatted, esthetically pleasing, text-based Web pages. Students create Web pages using Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), and discussion centers on how to publish completed pages and advertise those pages on the Web.
IT 238 3 credits
Web Development
This course builds upon a foundational understanding of Web design and examines professional Web development technologies. Topics include dynamic hypertext markup language (DHMTL), interactive technologies, advanced use of presentational technologies and Web 2.0. Emphasis is placed upon the appropriate use of Web programming tools and professional development standards.
IT 239 3 credits
Introduction to Image Editing and Formatting
This course is an introduction to image editing and its role in the disciplines of web design, electronic publishing and multimedia development. An overview is presented on image editing software applications, file formats, composition, color, text design, retouching, and manipulation of graphic and photographic images.
IT 240 ~ 3 credits
LAN Technologies
This foundational course covers local area network (LAN) topics including rationale for networking, Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) models, common network topologies and architecture, client/server concepts, basic hardware devices and usage, and basic networking security concepts.
IT 241 ~ 3 credits
Introduction to W-LAN Technologies
Concepts of wireless networking systems include wireless networking topologies, hardware protocols, hardware selection and implementation, interfaces with MAN, LAN and WAN networks, basic wireless security and integration concepts.
IT 242 ~ 3 credits
Introduction to WAN Technologies
This course covers Wide Area Networking/Enterprise networking concepts and its interface with metropolitan area networks (MAN) and local area networks (LAN). The course will cover telecommunication technologies, backbone technologies, hardware device protocol, hardware selection and usage, and basic WAN security considerations and planning.
IT 243 3 credits
Web Design Fundamentals
This course introduces development tools and techniques used to publish Web pages on the World Wide Web. Students use basic hypertext markup language, scripting and presentational technologies to create web sites without the aid of a software authoring application. Topics include XHTML, CSS, JavaScript, server hosting, site publication, site maintenance and Search Engine Optimization.
IT 244 ~ 3 credits
Intro to IT Security
General concepts of information systems security will be introduced. Content includes governmental views, positions and processes of national security. Other concepts include contingency planning and business resumption planning, backup schemes and implementation strategies, as well as an introduction to various types of invasive actions and prevention measures.
IT 245 3 credits
Foundation of Local Area Networks
This foundational course covers local area network topics including rationale for networking, Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) models, common network topologies and architecture, client/server concepts, basic hardware devices and usage, and basic networking security concepts.
IT 247 3 credits
IS Security Concepts
This course introduces general concepts of information systems security. Content includes governmental views, positions and processes of national security. Coursework explores other concepts, including contingency and business resumption planning, backup schemes and implementation strategies, as well as various types of invasive actions and prevention measures.
IT 250 3 credits
Fundamentals of Server Administration I
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to manage accounts and resources in a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 environment. The course is intended for systems administrator and systems engineer candidates who are responsible for managing accounts and resources. These tasks include managing user, computer, and group accounts; managing access to network resources; managing printers; managing an organizational unit in a network based on Active Directory service; and implementing Group Policy to manage users and computers.
IT 251 3 credits
Fundamentals of Server Administration II
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to implement, manage, and maintain a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 network infrastructure. The course is intended for systems administrator and systems engineer candidates who are responsible for implementing, managing, and maintaining server networking technologies. These tasks include implementing routing; implementing, managing, and maintaining Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), Domain Name System (DNS), and Windows Internet Name Service (WINS); securing Internet Protocol (IP) traffic with Internet Protocol security (IPSec) and certificates; implementing a network access infrastructure by configuring the connections for remote access clients; and managing and monitoring network access.
IT 252 3 credits
Fundamentals of Desktop Administration
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to implement and support customers who are planning to deploy Microsoft Windows XP Professional in a variety of stand-alone and network operating system environments. It provides in-depth, hands-on training for Information Technology (IT) professionals responsible for the planning, implementation, management, and support of Windows XP Professional. This course is based on the final, retail release of Windows XP Professional.
IT 256 3 credits
Wireless Networking Concepts
This course explores concepts of wireless networking systems, including wireless networking and topologies; hardware protocols; hardware selection and implementation; interfaces with local-area network (LAN), metropolitan area network (MAN), and wide-area network (WAN) networks; basic wireless security; and network integration concepts.
IT 257 3 credits
Wide Area Networking Concepts
This course covers Wide Area Networking concepts and its interface with metropolitan area networks (MAN) and local area networks (LAN). The course will cover telecommunication technologies, backbone technologies, hardware device protocol, hardware selection and usage, and basic WAN security considerations and planning.
IT 260 3 credits
Introduction to Desktop Databases
This course will cover the use desktop database software to create small database applications. Emphasis will be placed on creating databases and forms. Hands-on experience in the installation, design, and debugging of desktop database software will be included in this course.
IT 261 3 credits
Advanced Desktop Databases
This course is a continuation in the study of desktop database software. Emphasis will be placed on database design, reporting, queries and data analysis using desktop database software.
IT 264 3 credits
Introduction to SQL
This course provides an introduction to the Structured Query Language (SQL) that provides a unified language that lets you query, manipulate, or control data in a business applications environment.
IT 265 3 credits
Managing the Database Environment
This course provides an introduction to the installation, configuration, support, availability and recovery databases. The considerations for database administration addressing the requirements for user access, security, backup and recovery will be covered in this course.
IT 266 3 credits
Desktop Databases Development
This course will cover the use desktop database software to create small database applications. Emphasis will be placed on creating databases and forms. Hands-on experience in the installation, design, and debugging of desktop database software will be included in this course.
IT 280 3 credits
Computer Hardware Fundamentals
This course is an introduction to computer support fundamentals of personal computer (PC) hardware architecture, components, networking, configuration, upgrading, and repair. Activities that are critical to this course include remote access to hands-on LiveLabs and Scenarios.
IT 282 3 credits
Computer Software Fundamentals
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of the Vista and legacy Windows Operating Systems (98/ME, 2000/XP) for computer software configuration, file management, performance monitoring, optimization, maintenance, recover and security. Activities that are critical to this course include remote access to hands-on LiveLabs and Scenarios.
IT 284 3 credits
Enterprise Computer Support
This course is an introduction to the roles, responsibilities, and skills required to become a professional computer support PC Technician and provide exceptional computer support service. This includes the fundamentals of customer service, effective questioning, verbal and non-verbal communication, on-site support, telephone support, remote e-commerce support, and dealing with difficult customers. This course includes remote access to hands-on, real-world customer support issues and Scenarios.
IT 286 3 credits
Computer Maintenance and Troubleshooting
This course is an introduction to computer hardware and software maintenance and troubleshooting. Each Module of the course will focus on typical problem scenarios, diagnostics, procedures and solutions. The final Module of this course provides you with a problem scenario to demonstrate your understanding of diagnostic skills and solution implementation. This course includes remote access to hands-on LiveLabs and Scenarios.
IT 287 3 credits
Personal Computer Hardware Support
This course is an introduction to computer support fundamentals of personal computer (PC) hardware architecture, components, networking, configuration, upgrading, and repair.
IT 288 3 credits
Personal Computer OS Support
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of personal computer operating systems for computer software configuration, file management, performance monitoring, optimization, maintenance, recovery, and security.
IT 289 3 credits
Personal Computer Customer Support
This course is an introduction to the roles, responsibilities, and skills required to become a professional computer support technician and provide exceptional computer support service. This course includes the fundamentals of customer service, effective questioning, verbal and non-verbal communication, on-site support, telephone support, remote e-commerce support, and dealing with difficult customers.
IT 297 3 credits
Computer Systems Maintenance
This course is an introduction to computer hardware and software maintenance and troubleshooting. This course will focus on typical problem scenarios, diagnostics, procedures and solutions.
LC 201 ~ 3 credits
Foundations of Life Coaching
This theory based class focuses on building and establishing the qualities and skills necessary to become a life coach. Students explore self knowledge and apply what they learn to assist others to achieve personally set goals.
LC 202 ~ 3 credits
Principles and Practices of Life Coaching
In this class, theory of coaching is put into practice. Students gain additional experience through the practice of coach-client skills such as active listening, goal setting, effective evaluation, and conflict resolution.
LIT 210 3 credits
World Literature
This course covers fiction, drama, poetry, and essays by significant world authors throughout history. Students will focus on literary devices and conventions of each genre through the following activities: matching exercises and literary matrices, short essays and evaluations on specific reading selections, and a final comparative essay of any two pieces of literature covered in the course.
MAT 115 3 credits
Basic Mathematics
MAT 115 (Basic Mathematics) focuses on a foundational understanding of basic mathematics principles, including arithmetic, decimals, fractions, percentages, linear equations with one and two variables, and simple geometry.
MAT 116 3 credits
Algebra 1A
This course introduces basic algebra concepts and assists in building skills for performing specific mathematical operations and problem solving. Students will solve equations, evaluate algebraic expressions, solve and graph linear equations and linear inequalities, graph lines, and solve systems of linear equations and linear inequalities. These concepts and skills will serve as a foundation for subsequent business coursework. Applications to real-world problems are also explored throughout the course. This course is the first half of the college algebra sequence, which is completed in MAT 117, Algebra IB.
MAT 117 3 credits
Algebra 1B
This course explores advanced algebra concepts and assists in building the algebraic and problem solving skills developed in Algebra 1A. Students will solve polynomials, quadratic equations, rational equations, and radical equations. These concepts and skills will serve as a foundation for subsequent business coursework. Applications to real-world problems are also explored throughout the course. This course is the second half of the college algebra sequence, which began with MAT 116, Algebra 1A.
MAT 205 3 credits
Finite Mathematics
This course introduces the concepts of finite mathematics, with a focus on real-world application. Students will explore linear functions and equations, linear programming, and the use and application of matrices. Mathematical applications of finance, statistics, and probability are also reviewed.
MGT 210 ~ 3 credits
Supervision and Leadership
MGT 210 (Supervision and Leadership) addresses the difference between management and transformational leadership. Students will engage in a self-awareness analysis to determine how best to identify and implement their leadership strengths and to overcome their challenges. Major topical areas include the supervisor's role in an organization, effective leadership skills, problem-solving applications, effective motivation techniques, successful communication concepts, and methods for achieving maximum employee performance.
MGT 245 ~ 3 credits
Organizational Behavior
This course in Organizational Behavior uses realistic case studies, collaborative learning activities, and practical exercises to impart organizational behavior principles and theory. Students will apply management and leadership techniques garnered from successful business organizations to understand and practice management functions, including: understanding employee behavior and motivation, assessing performance, employing groups and teams, operationalizing communication, evaluating conflict, and making appropriate business decisions.
MGT 255 ~ 3 credits
Political, Legal and Ethical Issues in Business
This 9-week course focuses on the legal and regulatory environment of business. Topical areas include information on key functions of the law, dispute resolution, government agencies, contracts, tort law, property law, and international law. During this course, students will brief actual cases that illustrate the concepts being taught.
MKT 230 ~ 3 credits
Introduction to Marketing
Because businesses and individuals are all consumers of marketing, this course explores the why behind marketing efforts and how to apply basic marketing to current professional and personal situations. This course includes a general introduction to what marketing is as well as an understanding as to why it is important to organizations. Topics include the marketing 4P’s, the relationship between marketing and sales, and how marketing is used to create value. It also includes a focus on marketing for services and physical goods and considers the influences of the external environment on how companies market their product and services - both domestic and global.
MTH 156 ~ 3 credits
Math For Elementary Teachers I
This course is the first course of a two-part series designed for K-8 pre-service teachers to address the conceptual framework for mathematics taught in elementary school. The focus of part one will be on real number properties, patterns, operations and algebraic reasoning and problem solving. The relationship of the course concepts to the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Standards for K-8 instruction is also addressed.
MTH 157 ~ 3 credits
Math for Elementary Teachers II
This course is the second course in a two-part series designed for K-8 pre-service teachers to address the conceptual framework for mathematics taught in elementary school. The focus of part two will be on measurement, geometry, probability and data analysis. The relationship of the course concepts to the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Standards for K-8 instruction is also addressed.
PHI 105 3 credits
Introduction to Philosophy
In this course, philosophical thinking and reasoning are introduced through the evaluation of the historical development, key contributors, and principle issues of philosophy. Topical areas include both Western and Eastern philosophy, moral and political philosophy, religious philosophy, as well as feminism. Student activities include, but are not limited to, creating campaign ads for fictional political parties, writing a letter in the persona of a historical philosopher, and creating a PowerPoint® presentation that expresses personal philosophies.
POS 110 3 credits
American National Government
This course introduces students to the constitutional foundations and governing institutions of the federal government. Throughout the course, students address common political themes such as the nature and scope of governance, democracy, and patterns of political behavior.
PSY 210 ~ 3 credits
Introduction to Psychology: Why We Do What We Do
PSY 210 provides a general introduction to the vast and fascinating field of psychology as well as an understanding into why people behave the way they do. This course covers psychology's basic subject matter in a meaningful and relevant fashion. It also provides a discussion of the ways in which psychological knowledge is applied to improve the quality of individual and shared life. PSY 210 is an excellent gateway to more advanced courses in psychology.
PSY 220 ~ 3 credits
Positive Psychology: What’s Right With Me
How much control does a person have over his or her thoughts, feelings, and behaviors? What does it mean to be "free"? PSY 220 offers the student a contemporary and relevant approach to the study of psychology and the opportunity to learn more about themselves in the process. In the course, students will evaluate, understand, and build on their psychological strengths and those of others.
PSY 230 ~ 3 credits
Theories of Personality: I Think, Therefore Who Am I?
What is theory? What is personality? What is your theory of your personality? This course introduces the student to a number of personality theorists, their personalities, and their views in offering insight in to the question of the self. Psychoanalytic, social, behavioral traits, biological, humanistic, and cognitive are some of the theories that will be discussed in this course.
PSY 240 ~ 3 credits
The Brain, the Body, and the Mind: All Together Now
This course provides an introduction to the investigation of physiological and neurological basis for human behavior. The student will be able to study and discuss various influences on personality development, such as pre-natal maternal behavior; gender; nature versus nurture; brain development; genetic composition; sensory motor interactions; learning disabilities; drug impacts; and neurological diseases.
PSY 255 ~ 3 credits
Psychology and Diversity: Having an Identity Crisis
This course allows students to identify and analyze major forms of human diversity and understand the psychological basis for responding to diversity. Students have the opportunity to explore self-understanding and self-identification as well as the various approaches to each. The course includes topics such as family and external group identity; work relationships; formation of attitudes, beliefs, and ideologies; bias and prejudice; and cultural impacts on social behavior and human interaction.
PSY 265 ~ 3 credits
Psychology of Human Sexuality: What Turns You On and Why?
This course is a comprehensive view of the psychosocial and physiological aspects of sexual health in our contemporary society. The student will have opportunities to explore numerous relevant topics including love, intimacy, and relationships; sex and marketing; sexual diseases; sexual abuse; gender identity and sex roles; and socio-cultural influences and values in decision making. The course is designed for the student to understand attitudes and behaviors as they relate to sexual well-being and integrity.
PSY 270 ~ 3 credits
Abnormal Psychology: Abuse, Addiction, and Other Disorders
This course provides the student an introduction to the study of major psychological disorders, as defined in the DSM-IV-TR, their diagnoses, causes, and treatments. It will cover such subjects as depression, bipolarity, anxiety, panic, somatoform, disassociation, substance abuse, anorexia, schizophrenia, childhood disorders, as well as gender and cultural differences.
PSY 285 3 credits
Social Psychology: Why Can’t We All Just Get Along
This course provides a comprehensive introduction into the study of social psychology, the study of human interaction. Students will be able to explore and discuss topics such as self-concept, social perception and cognition, attitudes, social identity, interpersonal attractions, social influence, human aggression, and social psychology at work.
SCI 230 3 credits
Introduction to Life Science
This course introduces the student to scientific ideologies and concepts that not only shape our biological world, but also shape us as humans. Through a variety of comprehensive assessments and relevant discussions, students examine the scientific method, the dynamics of inheritance, and the affect humans have on the environment. Topics include the biology of cells, energy systems, and evolution.
SCI 241 3 credits
Nutrition
This course introduces students to the world of human nutrition. Students examine the components included in a healthy, balanced diet, and develop strategies to meet their changing nutritional needs throughout the various stages of life. Specific topics for the course include: the digestion process, functions and health benefits of specific nutrients, weight management andfitness, and the effects of nutritional deficiencies.
SCI 245 3 credits
Geology
This course gives an overview of physical geology by introducing concepts such as plate tectonics and geologic time. Students gain familiarity with the processes that shape the earth's surface and recognize the relevance of studying geology. Topics include the rock cycle, weathering, formation of geological features, and preservation of geological resources.
SCI 275 3 credits
Environmental Science
This course focuses on the causes, impacts, and solutions to environmental issues. Students identify global environmental issues, as well as develop and critique environmental action plans. Topics include ecosystems, energy, populations, resources, pollution, and sustainability.
SOC 120 3 credits
Introduction to Sociology
This course is a foundation for studies of sociology. In this course, students gain an understanding of the sociological perspective, theories, and research methods. Students also explore culture, race, ethnicity, socialization, social interaction, deviance, social control, groups, organizations, social and gender stratification, population, and social change.
SPM 200 ~ 3 credits
Introduction to Sport Management - Work at Play
This course introduces the student to the principles, practices, and myriad of possibilities within the sport industry. Perspectives from consumer to participant, recreational to professional, lifestyle to support sector, local to international are integrated in the course. Through interactive learning activities, case studies, and professional profiles, the student is engaged in exploring and analyzing the dynamics of sport management.
SPM 210 3 credits
Socio-Cultural Elements of Sport - Playing Well With Others
Although sport is traditionally viewed as a product of social interaction, this course discusses sport as a profile and instrument of human development. The course examines historical, psychological, sociologic, and economic aspects of sport, from local to international levels. It covers various topics including cultural, ethnic, gender, physical, and political dimensions and influences.
SPM 220 ~ 3 credits
Sport Ethics – Good Sports Do Finish First, and Last
Winning, losing, and particularly playing the game well, are all elements of ethics in sport. In this course, students are given opportunities to identify, examine, and present decisions on ethics issues related to sport and sport management. Theories of ethics, concepts of morality, codes of conduct, as well as personal philosophies in regard to social responsibility are some of the topics included in this course.
SPM 230 ~ 3 credits
Management and Leadership in Sport - It's Lifelong Coaching
This course introduces the student to the functions of management and leadership, as well as their application in sport settings. Managerial and leadership theories, skills, and behaviors are concepts discussed throughout the course.
SPM 240 ~ 3 credits
Communication in Sport – Talking a Great Game
In this course the student is presented with a broad range of skills development in the area of communication, as it pertains to sports and the sport industry. Topics such as interpersonal, small group, mass, and electronic communications, as well as media relations, interaction with the public, and broadcasting are addressed in this course.
SPM 250 ~ 3 credits
Sport Marketing – Build It, and They Will Participate
The fundamentals of marketing, as applied to the sport industry, are introduced to the student in this course. Basic concepts such as pricing, promotion, and distribution, as well as sponsorship, endorsement, and fundraising, are among the topics discussed. From product to event, the diverse managerial roles and responsibilities of developing sport marketing programs are examined in this course.
SPM 260 ~ 3 credits
Budget and Finance in Sport – More Than a Flip of the Coin
This course focuses on the principles and practices of financial management, as they apply to organizations in the sport industry. Included are the basics of accounting, budgets and budgeting systems, performance measures creation, and financial statement evaluation for the purpose of cost analysis and planning. Characteristics of revenue sources, both public and private, establishing prices, and risk management are also covered in this course.
UNIV 100 ~ 0 credits
University of Phoenix New Student Orientation (AXIA)
The purpose of this course is to provide an orientation that helps students to be successful in college. Students are guided through the University’s Online Learning System, explore techniques to be successful in college, and identify useful services and resources.
XACC 280 ~ 3 credits
Financial Accounting Concepts and Principles
This course covers the fundamentals of financial accounting as well as the identification, measurement, and reporting of the financial effects of economic events on the enterprise. Financial information is examined from the perspective of effective management decision making with special emphasis on the planning and controlling responsibilities of practicing managers.
XBIS 219 ~ 3 credits
Business Information Systems
This course provides an overview of Business Information Systems. This includes a broad foundation for both technical and non-technical business professionals. Special emphasis is placed on how information is used by different types of businesses across different industries.
XCOM 100 3 credits
Introduction to Communication
This course is an introduction to the field of communication with emphasis on the history of communication study, theories important to all areas of communication, the contexts in which communication occurs, and the issues that must be faced by students of communication. The course serves as an introduction to the strands of communication: interpersonal, small groups and teams, mass communication, organizational, intercultural, and rhetoric.
XCOM 200 3 credits
Foundations of Interpersonal Communication
This course includes the application of communication principles, theory, and research to the process of interpersonal communication; includes verbal, nonverbal, listening, conflict management, and communication skills most relevant to a broad range of interpersonal settings.
XCOM 225 3 credits
Foundations of Mass Communications
This course is a survey of the basic theories upon which our scientific understanding of mass communication is based. Ethical and related problems of mass communication will be studied from contemporary and historical viewpoints, as well as a critical analysis of the performance of the mass media.
XCOM 285 ~ 3 credits
Essentials of Managerial Communication
This course introduces students to the foundations of communication in a business setting. Students are exposed to various topics related to interpersonal and group communication with an eye toward applications in an office or virtual office setting. Students will develop skills in various forms of written communication, including memos, emails, business letters, and reports. Communication ethics and cross-cultural communications are also explored. Upon completing the course, students will have an awareness of their personal communication style and be able to identify areas for further exploration of communication as a business skill.
XECO 212 ~ 3 credits
Principles of Economics
This course introduces the fundamental theories of microeconomics and macroeconomics. The economic principles studied in this course apply to everyday life as students research an industry, debate issues with trade agreements, discuss the effects of a shift in labor supply and demand, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the Consumer Price Index calculation. In particular, students research an industry affected by the economy and perform an economic analysis of the chosen industry.
XMGT 216 ~ 3 credits
Organizational Ethics and Social Responsibility
This course provides a foundational perspective for socially responsible management practices in business. Special emphasis is placed on the inter-related nature of ethics, moral, legal, and social issues in managing individuals, groups, and the organization within a business environment.